Places in India that have prohibited entry of Indians

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You will be surprised to know that even after seven decades of independence; there are places in India where Indians are not allowed to enter and treated like foreigners. The strange fact is that these places are owned by Indians but only foreigners are allowed in these places and not Indians.

1. Sakura Ryokan Restaurant, Ahmedabad

The restaurant has banned all the Indians from entering Sakura Ryokan restaurant by declaring it ‘Only for Japanese’. The restaurant is located inside Gokuldham Bungalows at Sanand road of Ahmedabad. While the restaurant has been kept out of the league of Indians, it is managed completely by Indians.

Sakura Ryokan is a two-year-old joint which was opened for everyone but then just two months ago they sized it down to ‘Japanese Only’. Their current staff includes Mr. Bhupinder Singh who is a manager at the restaurant and women staff from Nagaland. He explained that “We had initially allowed Indians to dine too but, two months ago some men from the city had come for a meal and they kept staring at the Japanese lady clients. They also said something distasteful. I get my clients from various Japanese companies and I cannot afford to lose them. So I decided to keep Indians out”.

2. Red Lollipop Hostel, Chennai

Red Lollipop Hostel Chennai is located in the heart of cultural chennai just 300 m from Marina Beach and walkable distance to all popular malls, embassies,restaurants, temples,auditorium and other places of tourist interest.

Red Lollipop Hostel Chennai features free WiFi throughout the property with lots of common areas and private terrace for your convenience. Their facilities include Free WiFi – Fully AC dorms – Great location – Spacious lockers – Clean toilets – Security cameras – TV Room -paid laundry – Free bottled drinking water – Money exchange – comfortable common areas. By staying with us you will save a lot of money on commuting expenses as we have a Bus depot outside the hostel.

3. Malana Village in Himachal Pradesh

Malana is a former Indian village in the state of Himachal Pradesh. This lonely village in Malana Nala, a side valley of the Parvati valley in the northeast of the Kullu valley, is isolated from the rest of the world.

The peaks of Chanderkhani and Deo Tibba shade the village. It is located on a remote plateau by the torrential river Malana, at a height of 2,652 meters (8,701 feet) above sea level. Malana has its own lifestyle and social structure and people are strict in respecting their customs. The villagers are also known by the name “Touch Me Not” because no one is allowed to touch their belongings. Even people are restricted from entering the boundaries of this village. The language of this village is “Kanshi” which is considered to be sacred and outsiders cannot use this language. Apart from this, the villagers do not allow outsiders to enter into their temples because the villagers consider outsiders as untouchables.

4. Uno-In Hotel, Bangalore

Located in Bangalore, we are a hotel exclusively for Japanes. The Uno-Inn Hotel – set up two years ago in central Bangalore by a local entrepreneur in association with the Nippon Infrastructure Company to cater to the growing number of Japanese visitors – shot to limelight after it allegedly stopped Indians, British and Africans from entering the roof-top restaurant.

The 30-room hotel and the restaurant were meant exclusively for Japanese tourists and businessmen visiting the city.

5. Foreigners’ Only Beaches, Goa

Goa is known as the Pearl of the Orient that has several beaches. Among them is Foreigners’ Only Beaches, wherein Indians are not welcomed. This is because the locals want to protect their foreign guests in swimsuits and bikinis from the lusty Indians. Within the same area, there is a popular shack that even does not allot rooms to Indians. However, there are no official restrictions at these places.

Baga Beach, Arambol Beach, Mandrem  Beach, Vagator Beach, Morjim Beach, Colva Beach, Ashwem Beach, Ozran Beach, Benaulim Beach, Anjuna Beach are restricted for indians. There are less crowded beaches also for those who are looking forward to having a quiet time at a secluded place to relax or read a book or simply lie down and do sunbathing. Currently, these beaches have high demand from foreigners in order to make themselves comfortable and be away from the large groups of visitors.

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